Recurrent Depressive Disorder is Closely Linked To Lower Bone Density

Recurrent Depressive Disorder is Closely Linked To Lower Bone Density

A study has found that a depression disorder (MDD) that is found in men is linked with low bone density problem. Using an anti – depressant is closely related to low bone mineral density (BMD) but a lot of dependency was on the weight and bone measurement of an individual. The most common disorder, Osteoporosis is found to be a major factor in the case of fragile fractures. Talking about the women, the risks of osteoporosis increases with amplified threat related to menopause. Other affecting factors can be lack of physical activity, smoking, low consumption of calcium as well as vitamin D, medicines and some other diseases. This study was also published in the Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions.

This study also analysed an association of single as well as recurrent MDD episodes and the use of different antidepressants with the density of bone in men. The Geelong Osteoporosis Study also carried research on large population of people who were affected by osteoporosis. In the time period between 2006 and 2011, about 928 men who were aged 24 – 98 yrs has completed a questionnaire and had BMD assessment of the forearms, hips, spine and the full body.

Only 9 percent of the population was suffering from the single MDD and five percent was found suffering from the recurrent MDD. About 7 percent of people used antidepressants when the assessment was going on. Use of antidepressants was linked with low BMD in those men who were less weighted.